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Ged Prep Essay Questions

If you want to take the HSE (high school equivalency) exam you must be sure that you are prepared perfectly. Check tips from online HSE classes about types of essay topics used during the exam.

The HSE essay component will require you to compose a well-structured essay of roughly 200 to 400 words in a time frame of no more than 45 minutes. Here you can read also about online GED® courses.

An effective and good essay requires a robust dissertation statement backed by research in some well-formulated paragraphs that are created around a specific kind of rhetorical approach. Though the TASC-HiSET-GED essay topics can vary greatly, we can distinguish four key kinds of subjects: narrative, descriptive, informative or persuasive. When you have become familiarized with these varieties of topics, and when you have a good strategy ready for each class of topics, you can be sure to be properly prepared to be successful on the HSE essay part.

Narrative Topics

Narrative topics want you to come up with a private story or encounter. These types of topics could very well by asking questions like: “Think of an event you will definitely never forget about,” or “Explain something about an experience that taught you something fundamental.” This type of questions is asking you to tell a personal story and require a narrative strategy.

This implies that you need to learn to write an introduction paragraph, that ends with a thesis that expresses the precise experience or matter you came to understand. Every subsequent paragraph will indicate why and how the encounter was essential and you will produce examples of the value of the encounter in your personal life.

Descriptive Topics

Descriptive questions are asking you to give an explanation of a person, a place, a thing or an idea in descriptive details. For instance, a subject that will be taken care of best with a descriptive essay could be: “Persons you find at the zoo” or “Our favorite treasures” or “The most horrible food I ever ate” or a subject matter that instantly reminds you of a description. When you are writing on a descriptive topic, it could be helpful to identify several distinct characteristics of the topic and devote one paragraph to the description of each characteristic.

Persuasive Topics

Persuasive topics want you to write an essay about your personal thoughts and opinions on a controversial subject. A typical persuasive subject could be: “A lot of people feel the age for drinking alcohol really needs to be dropped to 18 for the reason that the age at which you can vote is 18 and not 21.” An additional persuasive topic could well be: “People should not be allowed to smoke outdoors in public places.” A persuasive topic is expecting you to develop an approach to agree or disagree with a subject in a brief, well-organized essay. It is sensible to rehearse setting up persuasive essays on many different present-day situations and concerns.

Informative Topics

Informative topics want you to write about a procedure or process. A good illustration of such an informative topic is: “Describe how to produce a cake” or “Present the best way to write an application letter.” A very effective technique for producing an essay on an informative subject is splitting up the process or procedure in several (3 or 4) pieces and spend one paragraph on each element of the process. For instance, an informative essay on the production of a cake could talk about reading the recipe and getting the required tools, finding the ingredients, determining the various ingredients, and mixing and preparing the batter.

 

 

The following is an example of a high-scoring essay response to our free practice GED Essay Prompt. Below our GED sample essay is a brief analysis justifying its perfect score.

The issue of how the police should interact with communities is a very hot-button topic. Some believe that criticizing the actions of the police hurts their ability to do their job, while others argue that the police have overstepped their authority and often cause more harm than good. Both arguments presented address this issue head on; however, it is the argument against the militarization of the police published by the ACLU that is the best supported and ultimately the most convincing argument.

While the second argument lacks specific statistics, or numerical data, the ACLU’s argument informs the reader that there were 80,000 military raids by police last year. Such an extraordinary figure surprises the reader and supports the idea that perhaps military-style raids have become too commonplace in society. The essay successfully uses statistics again when it cites a recent report stating, “of all the incidents studied where the number and race of the people impacted were known, 39 percent were Black, 11 percent were Latino, 20 were white.” This supports the idea that the militarization of police has had a disproportionately negative impact on African-American communities — further adding to the thesis that overall, the militarization of the police is detrimental to society.

Another reason why the ACLU’s argument is better supported than Mr. Hagner’s argument is because it addresses the idea of possible ethical corruption — an idea that Hagner’s essay ignores. The ACLU states, “Companies like Lockheed Martin and Blackhawk Industries are making record profits by selling their equipment to local police departments that have received Department of Homeland Security grants.” Here the ACLU implies that the reason for the militarization is simply profit; if this is true, then there is perhaps no actual real-world need for the militarization of the police at all. Ethically, companies are simply looking to make money from the police, rather than helping them to do their job.

Finally, the ACLU’s argument is much more convincing than Mr. Hagner’s argument because it uses much more impactful diction. The forcefulness of the language here, for example, when the ACLU calls the drug war “wasteful and failed” highlights the high-stakes nature of this issue. It appeals to the emotions of the reader, who is most likely a tax-payer and someone who has a vested interest in not having their money wasted by the government. The tone of this essay is much more impassioned than the tone of the second, and it helps to draw the reader in and engage them on an emotional level. The author implies that the reader may not be safe, since “heavily armed SWAT teams are raiding people’s homes in the middle of the night.”

In summary, the ACLU’s argument is better supported by statistics and data, accusations of ethical corruption, and forceful language that engages the reader. Mr. Hagner’s argument has some merit, and it does a good job organizing points with a numbered list, but ultimately it is too dry in tone and does not include any data or quotes from authority figures to back up its claims. The ACLU’s argument winds up being more convincing: the militarization of police is something we should all be concerned about.

Sample Essay Analysis

This essay is very well-organized. It uses 5 paragraphs and lays out the structure in the following manner:

  • Paragraph 1 — Introduction (why the ACLU position is better-supported)
  • Paragraph 2 — Reason #1 — Statistics (two examples given from passage)
  • Paragraph 3 — Reason #2 — Ethics (one example given from passage)
  • Paragraph 4 — Reason #3 — Vocabulary (two examples given from passage)
  • Paragraph 5 — Conclusion

In the introduction, the author thoughtfully introduces the topic of police militarization and explains why it is relevant to today’s society. Both arguments are introduced, and the thesis is clearly placed at the bottom of the paragraph so it is easy for the reader to find. The thesis clearly states which argument the author believes is better supported; the language is confident.

Each of the next three body paragraphs is well organized. Each paragraph starts with a transition word or phrase and includes one example that supports the thesis. The body paragraphs cite specific examples from the passage, and then explain how those examples support the important point. The author uses three difference examples: statistics, ethics, and vocabulary, to prove why the ACLU’s argument is better supported. These examples are different from one another and show that the author understands what makes an argument weak or strong.

Finally, the concluding paragraph makes a minor concession to the opposing side, praising the numbered list that appears therein, before reiterating and restating the thesis from the Introduction.

The essay avoids any grammar or spelling errors and the sentence structure is clear and varied with the appropriate usage of commas and other punctuation. Clear command of the English language is demonstrated. As a result, this essay would earn a perfect score.

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